Measures E

Statewide and Countywide Ballot Measure Recommendations

Below are the statewide and local recommendations for ballot measures from the Libertarian Party of California and the LP of Monterey County.

– Lawrence Samuels, Vice Chair

ELECTION 2016 -- Recommendations on Statewide Ballot Measures

At the August 6 meeting of its Executive Committee, the Libertarian Party of California considered the statewide propositions on the November 8 ballot, and took the following positions:

51 NO School bonds

52 NO State fees on hospitals

53 YES Voting on revenue bonds

54 YES Legislative transparency

55 NO Income tax hike extension

56 NO Cigarette tax increase

57 YES Parole for non-violent felons

58 NO Changes in bilingual education methods

59 No position taken Advisory vote on Citizens United repeal

60 NO Condoms required for adult film actors

61 NO State prescription drug purchases

62 YES End the Death Penalty in California

63 NO Extensive new gun control measures

64 NO Adult Use of Marijuana Act (AUMA) (While the Libertarian Party has been a strong supporter of ending marijuana prohibition for over 40 years, this proposition would do more harm than good, damaging medical availability, and creating additional criminal offenses and regulations.)

65 NO Directs grocery bag money to wildlife fund

66 NO Makes death penalty easier

67 NO Grocery stores can't provide plastic bags (referendum)

These recommendations are also posted on the LP California web site, at Ca.LP.org/measures

Monterey County Ballot Measures—LP of Monterey County

--Taxaholics Run Rampant in Monterey County

Measures A, J, L, O, W, Y: NO – Government greed knows no bounds. These measures levy heavy taxes on marijuana farmers in many cities and Monterey County, at rates up to $25 per square foot of farmed land, etc. Cannabis is already subjected to sales taxes. With high taxes and regulations, many growers will instead invade public parklands and illegally grow marijuana, threating the environment and hikers.

Measure E: NO – Tax for Monterey Peninsula Regional Park District. The MPRPD mismanaged the money from the last tax increase. Their former manager’s salary was more than the Governor of California, although he supervised only 16 workers. He is now making over $177,000 a year in retirement benefits. This measure has no sunset clause and the tax amount can increase without a public vote. See: http://www.montereypeninsulataxpayers.org/ballot-arguments/taxpayer-argu...

Measures G, H (city of Monterey): NO – Utility tax on cell phones, and the other measure will likely increase business license fees, which will be then passed on to consumers. Measure P (city of Pacific Grove): NO – Proposal to levy a 5-percent tax on non-profit organizations like the Monterey Bay Aquarium. Non-profits are always having a hard time getting donations to help the community. Why punish them?

Measure T (city of Salinas): NO – $167 million dollar bond for Hartnell College. Only one-third of the money goes to the college. Two-thirds will go to the bond company and bond-holders. When adding up the interest on the 30-year bond, the cost will be two or three times the original amount--$334 to $501 million dollars. Wasteful and unfair to taxpayers.

Measure X (TAMC transportation sales tax increase—countywide): NO – This tax will cost each taxpayer $1,400 for the term of the tax. TAMC was recently fined by the state of California over $800,000 for mismanagement. Federal funding through the recent “Fix America’s Surface Transportation (FAST) Act” will bring massive amounts of money for public transportation projects. We do not need both! See: http://votenoonx.com/

Measure Z (countywide): NO -- The oil industry in southern Monterey does not use chemical fracking. This is an effort to force fuel companies out of business. The problem here is that the extreme environmentalists also oppose solar power (Sierra Club sued the proposed solar plant in Lockwood, CA—and got $10 million) and wind turbines (kills birds). They oppose all forms of energy! Chevron already treats wastewater before putting it back into salt water aquifers deep underground. If wastewater was a problem, why do farmers and ranchers in the area oppose Measure Z?